Botanical Society of the British Isles Vice-County Census Catalogue of Vascular Plants of Great Britain, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands
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The Vice-county Census Catalogue is a list of vascular plant species and which vice-counties they have been found in. It is the culmination of several years work by four editors, C. A. Stace, R. G. Ellis, D. H. Kent & D. J. McCosh. They were aided by the cooperation of the vice-county recorders of the Botanical Society of the British Isles.
You can query the Internet version of this catalogue by following the links below. However, it is advisable to read the following introduction in order to interpret the results correctly.
Show the Vice-County distribution of a taxon and produce a map List all the vascular plant taxa recorded in a county Which taxa are in one vice county but not in another? List all the vascular plant taxa recorded in a group of vice counties Which taxa are in one region but not in another?

Vice Counties

There are 112 vice-counties in Great Britain plus the Isle of Man and Channel Islands. Their boundaries were laid down by H. C. Watson in the mid-nineteenth century. Although these boundaries often follow those of present-day administrative counties, the vice-county boundaries will never change. As the boundaries are fixed and the counties have a roughly similar size they are widely used for biological recording purposes. The Botanical Society of the British Isles appoints one Recorder to each vice-county and it is their role to catalogue and verify records of plants in that county.  

The Book

If you want to know more about the catalogue please refer to the paper version: Vice-County Census Catalogue of the Vascular Plants of Great Britain, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands

Edited by C. A. Stace, R. G. Ellis, D. H. Kent & D. J. McCosh

Published by the Botanical Society of the British Isles, London 2003; ISBN 0901158305

Definitions

A native plant is one that grows in an area without having been deliberately or accidentally introduced by mankind. Though the majority of these plants have been in Britain for thousands of years, this category also includes hybrids and new taxa that were generated naturally within the area. Naturally-formed hybrids are regarded as native, irrespective of whether their parents were introduced by mankind.

An archaeophyte is a naturalised plant that was introduced by mankind before AD1500. A neophyte is a naturalised plant that was introduced by mankind after AD1500.

The plants are further subdivided into those that have only been recorded before 1970 and those that have been recorded in 1970 or later. Included in the pre-1970 group are those species that are definitely known to have become extinct post-1970.